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Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433

Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433
Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433
Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433
Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433

Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433
Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433. MATERIAL:silver ORIGIN:Roman SIZE: See Photo. OUR GALLERY FOR MORE WONDERFUL ITEMS. WORTH COLLECTION, WE SUPPLY BEST AND RELIABLE ANTIQUES, ! Our aim is to provide best service for our customers. The item “Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433″ is in sale since Thursday, March 12, 2020. This item is in the category “Antiques\Antiquities\Roman”. The seller is “ancient.silkroad” and is located in bangkok. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Material: pure solid silver

Unusual rare Ancient Solid Silver Roman Elephant Hat Coin #A433

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UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant

UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant
UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant
UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant

UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant
Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius. See the attached pictures, is the actual item you will receive. It’s part of the description. It’s hard to find particularly item. It may take a longer time to arrive in some countries. 2 : How long I will the parcel? If not received how can I do? 3: If the goods have quality problems, how can I do? Your orders is our priority. The item “UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant” is in sale since Tuesday, March 10, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “legioantics” and is located in Marrakech. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: Denarius

UNRESEARCHED ANCIENT ROMAN AR SILVER DENARIUS COIN Julius Caesar / Elephant

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SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546
SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546
Item: i46546 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Septimius Severus – Roman Emperor : 193-211 A. Bronze Denarius 20mm (2.77 grams) Rome mint 207 A. Reerence: RIC IV 253; RSC 25 SEVERVS PIVS AVG – Laureate head right. AFRICA, Africa standing right, wearing elephant’s skin headdress; lion at side. L ucius Septimius Severus (or rarely Severus I) (April 11, 145/146-February 4, 211) was a Roman general, and Roman Emperor from April 14, 193 to 211. He was born in what is now the Berber part of Rome’s historic Africa Province. Septimius Severus was born and raised at Leptis Magna (modern Berber , southeast of Carthage , modern Tunisia). Severus came from a wealthy, distinguished family of equestrian rank. Severus was of Italian Roman ancestry on his mother’s side and of Punic or Libyan -Punic. Ancestry on his father’s. Little is known of his father, Publius Septimius Geta , who held no major political status but had two cousins who served as consuls under emperor Antoninus Pius. His mother, Fulvia Pia’s family moved from Italy to North Africa and was of the Fulvius gens, an ancient and politically influential clan, which was originally of plebeian status. His siblings were a younger Publius Septimius Geta and Septimia Octavilla. Severuss maternal cousin was Praetorian Guard and consul Gaius Fulvius Plautianus. In 172, Severus was made a Senator by the then emperor Marcus Aurelius. In 187 he married secondly Julia Domna. In 190 Severus became consul , and in the following year received from the emperor Commodus (successor to Marcus Aurelius) the command of the legions in Pannonia. On the murder of Pertinax by the troops in 193, they proclaimed Severus Emperor at Carnuntum , whereupon he hurried to Italy. The former emperor, Didius Julianus , was condemned to death by the Senate and killed, and Severus took possession of Rome without opposition. The legions of Syria , however, had proclaimed Pescennius Niger emperor. At the same time, Severus felt it was reasonable to offer Clodius Albinus , the powerful governor of Britannia who had probably supported Didius against him, the rank of Caesar, which implied some claim to succession. With his rearguard safe, he moved to the East and crushed Niger’s forces at the Battle of Issus. The following year was devoted to suppressing Mesopotamia and other Parthian vassals who had backed Niger. When afterwards Severus declared openly his son Caracalla as successor, Albinus was hailed emperor by his troops and moved to Gallia. Severus, after a short stay in Rome, moved northwards to meet him. In the Battle of Lugdunum , with an army of 100,000 men, mostly composed of Illyrian , Moesian and Dacian legions, Severus defeated and killed Clodius Albinus, securing his full control over the Empire. Severus was at heart a soldier , and sought glory through military exploits. In 197 he waged a brief and successful war against the Parthian Empire in retaliation for the support given to Pescennius Niger. The Parthian capital Ctesiphon was sacked by the legions, and the northern half of Mesopotamia was restored to Rome. His relations with the Roman Senate were never good. Severus ordered the execution of dozens of Senators on charges of corruption and conspiracy against him, replacing them with his own favorites. He also disbanded the Praetorian Guard and replaced it with one of his own, made up of 50,000 loyal soldiers mainly camped at Albanum , near Rome (also probably to grant the emperor a kind of centralized reserve). During his reign the number of legions was also increased from 25/30 to 33. He also increased the number of auxiliary corps (numerii), many of these troops coming from the Eastern borders. Additionally the annual wage for a soldier was raised from 300 to 500 denarii. Although his actions turned Rome into a military dictatorship , he was popular with the citizens of Rome, having stamped out the rampant corruption of Commodus’s reign. According to Cassius Dio. However, after 197 Severus fell heavily under the influence of his Praetorian Prefect, Gaius Fulvius Plautianus , who came to have almost total control of most branches of the imperial administration. Plautianus’s daughter, Fulvia Plautilla , was married to Severus’s son, Caracalla. Plautianuss excessive power came to an end in 205, when he was denounced by the Emperor’s dying brother and killed. The two following praefecti , including the jurist Aemilius Papinianus , received however even larger powers. Campaigns in Caledonia (Scotland). Starting from 208 Severus undertook a number of military actions in Roman Britain , reconstructing Hadrian’s Wall and campaigning in Scotland. He reached the area of the Moray Firth in his last campaign in Caledonia, as was called Scotland by the Romans. In 210 obtained a peace with the Picts that lasted practically until the final withdrawal of the Roman legions from Britain. Before falling severely ill in Eboracum (York). He is famously said to have given the advice to his sons: “Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men” before he died at Eboracum on. Upon his death in 211, Severus was deified by the Senate and succeeded by his sons, Caracalla and Geta , who were advised by his wife Julia Domna. The stability Severus provided the Empire was soon gone under their reign. Though his military expenditure was costly to the empire, Severus was the strong, able ruler that Rome needed at the time. He began a tradition of effective emperors elevated solely by the military. Severus was also distinguished for his buildings. Apart from the triumphal arch in the Roman Forum carrying his full name, he also built the Septizodium in Rome and enriched greatly his native city of Leptis Magna (including another triumphal arch on the occasion of his visit of 203). Christians were persecuted during the reign of Septimus Severus. Severus allowed the enforcement of policies already long-established, which meant that Roman authorities did not intentionally seek out Christians, but when people were accused of being Christians they could either curse Jesus and make an offering to Roman gods , or be executed. Furthermore, wishing to strengthen the peace by encouraging religious harmony through syncretism , Severus tried to limit the spread of the two quarrelsome groups who refused to yield to syncretism by outlawing conversion to Christianity or Judaism. Individual officials availed themselves of the laws to proceed with rigor against the Christians. Naturally the emperor, with his strict conception of law, did not hinder such partial persecution, which took place in Egypt and the Thebaid , as well as in Africa proconsularis and the East. Christian martyrs were numerous in Alexandria cf. Clement of Alexandria , Stromata , ii. 20; Eusebius , Church History , V. No less severe were the persecutions in Africa, which seem to have begun in 197 or 198 cf. Tertullian’s Ad martyres , and included the Christians known in the Roman martyrology as the martyrs of Madaura. Probably in 202 or 203 Felicitas and Perpetua suffered for their faith. Persecution again raged for a short time under the proconsul Scapula in 211, especially in Numidia and Mauritania. Later accounts of a Gallic persecution, especially at Lyon , are legendary. In general it may thus be said that the position of the Christians under Septimius Severus was the same as under the Antonines ; but the law of this Emperor at least shows clearly that the rescript of Trajan. Had failed to execute its purpose. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be quite happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546″ is in sale since Friday, February 21, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

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Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent. CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum. Aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolfs head). /19 – 18 mm. The item “Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake” is in sale since Monday, February 24, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “vestodo0″ and is located in de. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver
  • Denomination: Denarius

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

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SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546
SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546
SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546
Item: i46546 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Septimius Severus – Roman Emperor : 193-211 A. Bronze Denarius 20mm (2.77 grams) Rome mint 207 A. Reerence: RIC IV 253; RSC 25 SEVERVS PIVS AVG – Laureate head right. AFRICA, Africa standing right, wearing elephant’s skin headdress; lion at side. L ucius Septimius Severus (or rarely Severus I) (April 11, 145/146-February 4, 211) was a Roman general, and Roman Emperor from April 14, 193 to 211. He was born in what is now the Berber part of Rome’s historic Africa Province. Septimius Severus was born and raised at Leptis Magna (modern Berber , southeast of Carthage , modern Tunisia). Severus came from a wealthy, distinguished family of equestrian rank. Severus was of Italian Roman ancestry on his mother’s side and of Punic or Libyan -Punic. Ancestry on his father’s. Little is known of his father, Publius Septimius Geta , who held no major political status but had two cousins who served as consuls under emperor Antoninus Pius. His mother, Fulvia Pia’s family moved from Italy to North Africa and was of the Fulvius gens, an ancient and politically influential clan, which was originally of plebeian status. His siblings were a younger Publius Septimius Geta and Septimia Octavilla. Severuss maternal cousin was Praetorian Guard and consul Gaius Fulvius Plautianus. In 172, Severus was made a Senator by the then emperor Marcus Aurelius. In 187 he married secondly Julia Domna. In 190 Severus became consul , and in the following year received from the emperor Commodus (successor to Marcus Aurelius) the command of the legions in Pannonia. On the murder of Pertinax by the troops in 193, they proclaimed Severus Emperor at Carnuntum , whereupon he hurried to Italy. The former emperor, Didius Julianus , was condemned to death by the Senate and killed, and Severus took possession of Rome without opposition. The legions of Syria , however, had proclaimed Pescennius Niger emperor. At the same time, Severus felt it was reasonable to offer Clodius Albinus , the powerful governor of Britannia who had probably supported Didius against him, the rank of Caesar, which implied some claim to succession. With his rearguard safe, he moved to the East and crushed Niger’s forces at the Battle of Issus. The following year was devoted to suppressing Mesopotamia and other Parthian vassals who had backed Niger. When afterwards Severus declared openly his son Caracalla as successor, Albinus was hailed emperor by his troops and moved to Gallia. Severus, after a short stay in Rome, moved northwards to meet him. In the Battle of Lugdunum , with an army of 100,000 men, mostly composed of Illyrian , Moesian and Dacian legions, Severus defeated and killed Clodius Albinus, securing his full control over the Empire. Severus was at heart a soldier , and sought glory through military exploits. In 197 he waged a brief and successful war against the Parthian Empire in retaliation for the support given to Pescennius Niger. The Parthian capital Ctesiphon was sacked by the legions, and the northern half of Mesopotamia was restored to Rome. His relations with the Roman Senate were never good. Severus ordered the execution of dozens of Senators on charges of corruption and conspiracy against him, replacing them with his own favorites. He also disbanded the Praetorian Guard and replaced it with one of his own, made up of 50,000 loyal soldiers mainly camped at Albanum , near Rome (also probably to grant the emperor a kind of centralized reserve). During his reign the number of legions was also increased from 25/30 to 33. He also increased the number of auxiliary corps (numerii), many of these troops coming from the Eastern borders. Additionally the annual wage for a soldier was raised from 300 to 500 denarii. Although his actions turned Rome into a military dictatorship , he was popular with the citizens of Rome, having stamped out the rampant corruption of Commodus’s reign. According to Cassius Dio. However, after 197 Severus fell heavily under the influence of his Praetorian Prefect, Gaius Fulvius Plautianus , who came to have almost total control of most branches of the imperial administration. Plautianus’s daughter, Fulvia Plautilla , was married to Severus’s son, Caracalla. Plautianuss excessive power came to an end in 205, when he was denounced by the Emperor’s dying brother and killed. The two following praefecti , including the jurist Aemilius Papinianus , received however even larger powers. Campaigns in Caledonia (Scotland). Starting from 208 Severus undertook a number of military actions in Roman Britain , reconstructing Hadrian’s Wall and campaigning in Scotland. He reached the area of the Moray Firth in his last campaign in Caledonia, as was called Scotland by the Romans. In 210 obtained a peace with the Picts that lasted practically until the final withdrawal of the Roman legions from Britain. Before falling severely ill in Eboracum (York). He is famously said to have given the advice to his sons: “Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men” before he died at Eboracum on. Upon his death in 211, Severus was deified by the Senate and succeeded by his sons, Caracalla and Geta , who were advised by his wife Julia Domna. The stability Severus provided the Empire was soon gone under their reign. Though his military expenditure was costly to the empire, Severus was the strong, able ruler that Rome needed at the time. He began a tradition of effective emperors elevated solely by the military. Severus was also distinguished for his buildings. Apart from the triumphal arch in the Roman Forum carrying his full name, he also built the Septizodium in Rome and enriched greatly his native city of Leptis Magna (including another triumphal arch on the occasion of his visit of 203). Christians were persecuted during the reign of Septimus Severus. Severus allowed the enforcement of policies already long-established, which meant that Roman authorities did not intentionally seek out Christians, but when people were accused of being Christians they could either curse Jesus and make an offering to Roman gods , or be executed. Furthermore, wishing to strengthen the peace by encouraging religious harmony through syncretism , Severus tried to limit the spread of the two quarrelsome groups who refused to yield to syncretism by outlawing conversion to Christianity or Judaism. Individual officials availed themselves of the laws to proceed with rigor against the Christians. Naturally the emperor, with his strict conception of law, did not hinder such partial persecution, which took place in Egypt and the Thebaid , as well as in Africa proconsularis and the East. Christian martyrs were numerous in Alexandria cf. Clement of Alexandria , Stromata , ii. 20; Eusebius , Church History , V. No less severe were the persecutions in Africa, which seem to have begun in 197 or 198 cf. Tertullian’s Ad martyres , and included the Christians known in the Roman martyrology as the martyrs of Madaura. Probably in 202 or 203 Felicitas and Perpetua suffered for their faith. Persecution again raged for a short time under the proconsul Scapula in 211, especially in Numidia and Mauritania. Later accounts of a Gallic persecution, especially at Lyon , are legendary. In general it may thus be said that the position of the Christians under Septimius Severus was the same as under the Antonines ; but the law of this Emperor at least shows clearly that the rescript of Trajan. Had failed to execute its purpose. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be quite happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546″ is in sale since Saturday, January 24, 2015. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS 207AD AFRICA Elephant Lion Ancient Silver Roman Coin i46546

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Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent. CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum. Aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolfs head). /19 – 18 mm. The item “Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake” is in sale since Tuesday, December 17, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “vestodo0″ and is located in de . This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver
  • Denomination: Denarius

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

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Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Up for sale here is an excellent Roman Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 49-48 BC. Elephant, Snake, Implements, / 2.99 gr. This is a very scarce Julius Caesar Elephant AR Denarius with sharp detail and attractive surfaces. Quite a remarkable coin, now over 2000 years old. ADVICE NOT CORRECT USERS I DO NOT SEND FOR BULGARIA; ROMANIA, GREECE, CROATIA, POLAND, SLOVAKIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, AND HUNGARY MAY MAKE PARTICIPATION WITH MY LICENSE. The item “Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake” is in sale since Sunday, December 8, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “didbg84″ and is located in bg . This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Date: 48 BC
  • Composition: Silver
  • Ruler: Julius Caesar
  • Denomination: Denarius

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

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Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant

Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant

Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant
One original ancient Roman silver coin of: Septimius Severus Denarius. Struck – Emesa mint, 196-197 AD. (VF) Well centered nice specimen. / L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, laureate head right /. / MVNIFICENTIA AVG, Elephant wearing cuirass walking right. Commemorates the games, that were also mentioned in the Historia Augusta, which were given by Severus in mid 197 prior to his departure on his second Parthian expedition. The elephant on the coin is neither an Indian nor an African elephant of today, but a now-extinct species which lived in North Africa in Roman times. Sole reign; 195-198 A. Husband of Julia Domna. Lucius Septimius Severus (or rarely Severus I) (April 11, 145/146-February 4, 211) was a Roman general, and Roman Emperor from April 14, 193 to 211. He was born in what is now the Berber part of Rome’s historic Africa Province. Septimius Severus was born and raised at Leptis Magna (modern Berber, southeast of Carthage, modern Tunisia). Severus came from a wealthy, distinguished family of equestrian rank. Severus was of Italian Roman ancestry on his mother’s side and of Punic or Libyan-Punic ancestry on his father’s. Little is known of his father, Publius Septimius Geta, who held no major political status but had two cousins who served as consuls under emperor Antoninus Pius. His mother, Fulvia Pia’s family moved from Italy to North Africa and was of the Fulvius gens, an ancient and politically influential clan, which was originally of plebeian status. His siblings were a younger Publius Septimius Geta and Septimia Octavilla. Severus’s maternal cousin was Praetorian Guard and consul Gaius Fulvius Plautianus. In 172, Severus was made a Senator by the then emperor Marcus Aurelius. In 187 he married secondly Julia Domna. In 190 Severus became consul, and in the following year received from the emperor Commodus (successor to Marcus Aurelius) the command of the legions in Pannonia. On the murder of Pertinax by the troops in 193, they proclaimed Severus Emperor at Carnuntum, whereupon he hurried to Italy. The former emperor, Didius Julianus, was condemned to death by the Senate and killed, and Severus took possession of Rome without opposition. The legions of Syria, however, had proclaimed Pescennius Niger emperor. At the same time, Severus felt it was reasonable to offer Clodius Albinus, the powerful governor of Britannia who had probably supported Didius against him, the rank of Caesar, which implied some claim to succession. With his rearguard safe, he moved to the East and crushed Niger’s forces at the Battle of Issus. The following year was devoted to suppressing Mesopotamia and other Parthian vassals who had backed Niger. When afterwards Severus declared openly his son Caracalla as successor, Albinus was hailed emperor by his troops and moved to Gallia. Severus, after a short stay in Rome, moved northwards to meet him. On February 19, 197, in the Battle of Lugdunum, with an army of 100,000 men, mostly composed of Illyrian, Moesian and Dacian legions, Severus defeated and killed Clodius Albinus, securing his full control over the Empire. Severus was at heart a soldier, and sought glory through military exploits. In 197 he waged a brief and successful war against the Parthian Empire in retaliation for the support given to Pescennius Niger. The Parthian capital Ctesiphon was sacked by the legions, and the northern half of Mesopotamia was restored to Rome. His relations with the Roman Senate were never good. Severus ordered the execution of dozens of Senators on charges of corruption and conspiracy against him, replacing them with his own favorites. He also disbanded the Praetorian Guard and replaced it with one of his own, made up of 50,000 loyal soldiers mainly camped at Albanum, near Rome (also probably to grant the emperor a kind of centralized reserve). During his reign the number of legions was also increased from 25/30 to 33. He also increased the number of auxiliary corps (numerii), many of these troops coming from the Eastern borders. Additionally the annual wage for a soldier was raised from 300 to 500 denarii. Although his actions turned Rome into a military dictatorship, he was popular with the citizens of Rome, having stamped out the rampant corruption of Commodus’s reign. According to Cassius Dio, however, after 197 Severus fell heavily under the influence of his Praetorian Prefect, Gaius Fulvius Plautianus, who came to have almost total control of most branches of the imperial administration. Plautianus’s daughter, Fulvia Plautilla, was married to Severus’s son, Caracalla. Plautianus’s excessive power came to an end in 205, when he was denounced by the Emperor’s dying brother and killed. The two following praefecti , including the jurist Aemilius Papinianus, received however even larger powers. Campaigns in Caledonia (Scotland). Starting from 208 Severus undertook a number of military actions in Roman Britain, reconstructing Hadrian’s Wall and campaigning in Scotland. He reached the area of the Moray Firth in his last campaign in Caledonia, as was called Scotland by the Romans.. In 210 obtained a peace with the Picts that lasted practically until the final withdrawal of the Roman legions from Britain, before falling severely ill in Eboracum (York). He is famously said to have given the advice to his sons: “Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men” before he died at Eboracum on February 4, 211. Upon his death in 211, Severus was deified by the Senate and succeeded by his sons, Caracalla and Geta, who were advised by his wife Julia Domna. The stability Severus provided the Empire was soon gone under their reign. Though his military expenditure was costly to the empire, Severus was the strong, able ruler that Rome needed at the time. He began a tradition of effective emperors elevated solely by the military. Severus was also distinguished for his buildings. Apart from the triumphal arch in the Roman Forum carrying his full name, he also built the Septizodium in Rome and enriched greatly his native city of Leptis Magna (including another triumphal arch on the occasion of his visit of 203). Christians were persecuted during the reign of Septimus Severus. Severus allowed the enforcement of policies already long-established, which meant that Roman authorities did not intentionally seek out Christians, but when people were accused of being Christians they could either curse Jesus and make an offering to Roman gods, or be executed. Furthermore, wishing to strengthen the peace by encouraging religious harmony through syncretism, Severus tried to limit the spread of the two quarrelsome groups who refused to yield to syncretism by outlawing conversion to Christianity or Judaism. Individual officials availed themselves of the laws to proceed with rigor against the Christians. Naturally the emperor, with his strict conception of law, did not hinder such partial persecution, which took place in Egypt and the Thebaid, as well as in Africa proconsularis and the East. Christian martyrs were numerous in Alexandria cf. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata , ii. 20; Eusebius, Church History , V. No less severe were the persecutions in Africa, which seem to have begun in 197 or 198 cf. Tertullian’s Ad martyres , and included the Christians known in the Roman martyrology as the martyrs of Madaura. Probably in 202 or 203 Felicitas and Perpetua suffered for their faith. Persecution again raged for a short time under the proconsul Scapula in 211, especially in Numidia and Mauritania. Later accounts of a Gallic persecution, especially at Lyon, are legendary. In general it may thus be said that the position of the Christians under Septimius Severus was the same as under the Antonines; but the law of this Emperor at least shows clearly that the rescript of Trajan had failed to execute its purpose. Original ancient Roman coin as pictured and described above. All items will be sent out in protected envelope and boxed if necessary. Every item offered by cameleoncoins is unconditionally guaranteed to be genuine & authentic. If in the unlikely event that an item is found to be reproduction, full return privileges are within 14 days of receiving the coins. The item “Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant” is in sale since Tuesday, July 2, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “cameleoncoins” and is located in Winnetka, California. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Date: 196
  • Composition: Silver
  • Ruler: Septimius Severus
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Material: silver

Rare original ancient Roman silver coin Septimius Severus denarius Elephant

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Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain

Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain

Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain
Julius Caesar “Elephant” Silver Denarius, set in a 925 Solid Sterling Silver Bezel. 925 Solid Sterling Silver Chain included. Military mint traveling with Caesar, struck circa April – August 49 BC. Obverse: Elephant advancing right, trampling on horned serpent. Reverse: Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis, and apex. The pendants approximate diameter is 19.5 mm. The chain’s length is 19. Please take a look at the photos the actual item pictured. Thank you for looking. This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar, struck in the aftermath of his crossing of the Rubicon and being declared’hostis’ (enemy of the state) by the Senate, led by Pompey the Great. The item “Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain” is in sale since Sunday, June 30, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins\Coins\Ancient\Roman\Roman Imperial (96-235AD)”. The seller is “sport_authority” and is located in Orlando, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Julius Caesar Ancient Roman Elephant Denarius Coin with 925 Silver Bezel & Chain

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Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake
Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent. CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum. Aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolfs head). /19 – 18 mm. The item “Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake” is in sale since Thursday, November 7, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “vestodo0″ and is located in de . This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver
  • Denomination: Denarius

Rome Ancient Silver Denarius Julius Caesar AR Denarius Coin 48 BC Elephant Snake

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